Student Appreciation Sale Oct 1-10

 

 

 

 

Step away from the lecture hall, the books and the homework for a few minutes at Shepherd & Schaller, where our Student Appreciation Sale is our high-five for your grueling studies and hard earned reward.

Visit us in-store October 1-10 and present your current student id card for 10% off all in-stock clothing, shoes, boots and day packs.  You even get pre-season pricing on ski and snowboard equipment to pay less than your parents and their friends.  How’s that for a reward?! Yep, your student credentials mean you pay less for the must-haves you see all over campus.

Celebrate your school pride by wearing your schools colors, logo or even that foam finger you’ve got.  That, with your student id will earn you a change to win a prize!

Take our advice: work hard, play hard.  You deserve it.

The fine print:

  • 10% discount is off full retail price on our price tag
  • This discount may not be combined with other discounts
  • Discount not available on special order clothes, shoes or boots or on equipment other than day packs.
  • You MUST present your current student ID to receive the discount
  • Discount is not retroactive to previous purchases
  • Tell your friends about Shep’s Student Appreciation Sale and follow us on Social Media for more great deals, contests and events!

Snowboard and Ski Warranty. How, Why, When.

What does and doesn’t qualify a Snowboard or Ski for warranty?  How, why, when?

First, thank you for shopping at Shepherd & Schaller.  Know that Ski and Snowboard manufacturers are diligent about their product design and construction, and it’s rare that the ski and snowboard equipment we sell suffers a defect, but when it does, our Warranty Manager will work with the manufacturer who will answer the question “Does this qualify for warranty coverage?” Then, following the manufacturer’s instruction, we will handle your warranty claim.  We are usually required to provide them with a photo of the gear in question and occasionally we are instructed to ship it back to the manufacturer for further inspection.  The manufacturer makes the decision.  We are the middle-man in the process, happy to help.

How will you know when a warranty is likely?  When is it worth pursuing?  We’re sharing a post from the fine folks at MichiganBoarder.com which colorfully provides some answers.  They speak the truth, which can be difficult to explain and sometimes hard to hear.  Their explanation for snowboards can generally be transferred to skis as well.

We’re grateful that you shopped at Shepherd & Schaller and we are here to assist you with the warranty process, so please notify us right away if your equipment seems unhealthy.

The following, which specifically addresses snowboard warranties, was posted by BennyWest on MichiganBoarder.com on March 4, 2016.  Stop here if you are sensitive to colorful language, including profanity.

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Look, a lot of us have been there, disappointed in the longevity of our new whip. Before I get into this article I just want to clarify this isn’t about anyone in particular. It has been an odd year at my store and the kids are really putting a beating on their decks. I’m not upset with any of my kids or the brands. I love you little monsters with all my heart. A big shout out to our brands too because they have gone above and beyond; another reason to shop at a store with doors. That online retailor isn’t going to do shit for you.

So you broke your board and you want it warrantied. Why did it break? Was it made poorly? Is it the brand’s fault you’re a grown ass man on a 149cm gapping to flat? Is it their fault that these kids have gotten so good that folded boards are becoming more and more common? It’s not.

See the whole warranty thing from most brands covers the board if there was a mishap in its original construction. By “mishap” I mean the glue didn’t cure and there is a delamination or the edge is coming out RANDOMLY, or the die cut graphics on the base are falling out, and sometimes, even when the board snaps in a weird spot because the wood inside was sub par. I mean shit like that, a MANUFACTURING problem. A warranty covers something going wrong with the board because somewhere down the line there was a faulty build material or a mistake in the build. That’s what is covered. No more, no less. The tech and build processes that go into snowboards have got so precise that a true warranty is getting extremely rare. The companies say their board will last X (usually 1 or 2) amount of years from normal snowboarding. What normal snowboarding entails is riding the fucker down the hill and not touching anything but snow. I cannot stress this enough, your board being damaged from any contact with a solid object is not a warranty. That’s right, any damage from riding rails, hitting a rock, and landing tail or nose heavy on your deck is NOT A WARRANTY.

NOT A WARRANTY

NOT A WARRANTY

Now, this is a conundrum because all these brands make boards specifically geared toward the specific misuse of said board and violation of said warranty. You know what I am saying? You buy your deck and that sticker on the back shows how great it is on rails or jumps or in the backcountry. How does that work? Well, I will come back to that.

I ‘ve concluded that there are four types of reasons your board is broke.

Somewhere along the build process a shitty material or a fuck up in the build caused your deck to break in one way or another. This is legit; your shop will dial you in. I do mean shop. *side note, if you buy your gear online you don’t care about snowboarding. I don’t care if it’s cheaper. Any shop will price match. Don’t come to us when the boots you bought online don’t fit and you’re heading up north tomorrow. Actually we will help you because we love you but we will talk shit about you when you leave.

You’re abusing your deck and being a slap dick with your friends being all “I don’t give a fuck” and intentionally beating your shit up only to turn around and show your boys how gnarly you were and your deck is broke. When you do this you’re giving a bad image to a normally very well respected brand. You’re hurting their reputation all to massage your ego.

You are snowboarding above your level. What this means is you’re good. So good it’s time for you to step up to bigger shit. When I made the comment above about brands making decks that are specifically designed to void the warranty; this is where that comment has weight. Dan Brisse can go huge and his board takes what he dishes out and then over time it’s had too much and finally dies. Pro boards actually go quite a long ways. I’m talking a majority of the season if not more. Now why is that? They are doing this super heavy shit, but their boards don’t break. It’s because they’re doing it cleaner and have the science of things locked up. If you are mounting your rail tricks right and stomping your jumps the board can actually deal with the abuse. If you’re not quite there and you’re dinging your lip slides and not going fast enough gapping out to stuff it will break.

Likely a warranty

Likely a warranty

You’re a monster. You are Frank April and you are doing stuff so big that the board can’t handle it. Congrats, but if you are that good you need to keep in mind that pros get free snowboards and you don’t. Does that mean dial it back? Absolutely not, what that means is it’s a cost of doing business. You want to go hard on shit you’re gonna break boards and you need to understand that you will have to pony up some coin.

There is not a lot board brands can do to beef up their boards beyond what they’ve done already. If you want a fun park board with a softer flex it’s not gonna be bullet proof. You want a bulletproof deck? Buy a Never Summer and ride that 2×8 down the hill cursing the board all the way to the ATM machine. It is what it is. You can’t have your cake and eat it too.

The other thing is… don’t be a tough guy and “finish” your deck. If you have a legitimate odd ball break send the board back. Putting your foot in the crack and breaking it is just pretty much throwing you chance at a warranty right out the window. If you got a box in your Subaru full of freshies than by all means, but again you bring that in to a shop all decapitated and it’s over.

I can’t speak for other shops, but I can say the brands we carry go out of their way to make it right with the customer. Core shops have relationships with the reps and the brands and are usually able to do something for you. Shops like the ones I speak of carry boards from brands that are snowboarder owned and operated. They know what it’s like to be bummed on a deck and I promise they don’t want that for you. When you’re cursing whatever brand to your friends. Remember, you either ride a bulletproof plank that is the equivalent of riding a picnic table on it’s back down the hill or you ride that damn-nice very well built park deck. Also, I recommend stepping up from the four hundred dollar range; a lot of pro models have that extra tech in them that adds a few seasons to that life span. Or perhaps in your case it will get you through the season… ha ha! Come on guys give your local shop a break… whooo whah! Don’t judge me.

2015 Black Friday Deals at Shepherd & Schaller

We’re a little calm in the Black Friday storm.  Shop Shepherd & Schaller Sporting Goods from a civilized 8am-8pm on November 27th.  You’ll enjoy all that’s best about preparing for gift giving season.  Helpful expert customer service, a welcoming shopping environment and genuine value.  Our premium outdoor specialty equipment, outerwear, sportswear, footwear and accessories are discounted for savings you expect.  Ski and Snowboard equipment is all on sale, along with the accessories you need for a perfect day on the slopes.  Bikes, water sports and camping gear all have a gift-friendly low Shep’s price too.

Want a peak at the special deals you’ll get not only Black Friday, but while supplies last through December 6th?  Simply scroll!

Shepherd & Schaller Gift Cards are a welcome gift.  The skier or snowboarder on your list would love to treat their ski and snowboard gear to a day of TLC in our newly expanded Back Shop.  Four new Wintersteiger tuning machines in the hands of our artist, Pete Kohlmoos, tune your product to good-as-new condition, ready to set records on the race course and feel like butter under your feet.  Complete 10-step ski or snowboard tune and wax is $34.99 (Reg. $50).  We offer Hot Box wax, custom repairs and computer calibrated binding settings too.

And because we know you are wondering, Smartwool Socks will be Buy 3 Get 1 Free.  Santa’s favorite stocking!

Here are just a few of the deals in store:

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BF 2015 5 BF 2015 4 BF 2015 3 BF 2015 2

Team Night 2015

Calling ski & snowboard team & club members! Join us at Shep’s when we host a night for you; a night with access to special team discounts. If you’ve been around before, you probably know that raffles and giveaways are sure to show up too. 🙂 Rally up your teammates, come on down, and get the gear you need to have the best season of your life.

Are you a coach wanting to get your team involved? Call us at the store and we’ll chat! 715-845-5432.

Thinking about joining a team?  Our friends from Granite Peak Ski Team will be here to help you get started.

 

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Sneak Peak: 2016 Ski and Snowboard Staff Picks!

This past month members of our shop crew got the chance to go to Afton Alps and demo the 2016 ski and snowboard lineups. They each took a look at the new product, and pegged different aspects that stood out to each of them. Each of their notes on the new product lineups are as follows.

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2016 Skis

Sep’s Notes:

It’s always hard to pick a favorite ski in today’s offerings – technology has come so far and nearly every ski performs great.  That said, I did test a few that seemed to perform at a level above the rest.  Before I share though, a little about me.  I’m just shy of 6’0, weight 145 pounds, and ski very aggressively.  I prefer medium radius turns to short ones and primarily stick the groomers.  That out of the way, here are my top picks:

Overall favorite ski:  Salomon MTN 95, tested length 177.  If I could only buy one ski next year, this would be it.  It’s light but stable, wide but quick in the turns, and carves extremely well.  This was one of only three skis that made me laugh out loud with enjoyment.

Best sub $500 ski: Salomon X-Drive 80, tested length 177.  We carried this in the store this season, and it’s returning unchanged for 15/16.  Still, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this ski all day long.  While it’s great for cranking up the speed, what I loved about it is it’s versatility: fast, slow, long turns, tight turns – it simply does it all.  And it does it all really well.  (For a sub $500 ski!!!)  Unlike last year with no real contenders though, Head’s new Natural Instinct gave the Salomon a run for it’s money at $449.  Minus top end speed stability, it performed wonderfully and was a joy to ski.

Race ski recap:  Both Volkl and Head return for the following season unchanged, and like I mentioned last year, both are amazing race skis.  Torn between which to purchase?  Pick a color.  They’re both equally good.  I only give the nod to Head in the junior race department with their Worldcup iRace.  With sizes available down to 100cm, we love having a true race ski to offer our junior racers for their early racing development.

Women’s ski recap: While none of our women staffers came to the demo, we still made a point to ski as many women’s skis as we could.  Why?  We sell a lot of skis to women, and we want to provide the best advice and information to our women customers as well.  And let me tell you this straight away: women’s skis have come a long way!  Want something that simply rips? It’s out there.  Want something that practically skis itself?  Easy.  There are a ton of skis waiting for you.  So my favorites?  K2 nailed it with their new women’s skis, and the Luv Sick 80Ti is going to be a favorite for sure.  Super quick edge to edge, very easy to turn, stable, and light weight.  It’s really the perfect on piste ski.  For those looking for something even move versatile, the Nordica Belle to Belle skied great and would be a wonderful ski for that beginner to intermediate gal looking for one ski to do it all.  Head’s Joy line of skis continues to surprise me with great looks, low weight, and killer price, and I had a blast on their Absolut Joy.  Lastly, Volkl remains the ski to choose if carving is your thing.  Even their entry level Aurena carved a great turn at moderate speeds, and felt racey from turn to turn.  With nearly all the skis I tried, it was easy to forget I was skiing women’s specific models halfway through each run.  They’re that good!

Other favorites:  Without going into more detail other than saying they were a blast to ski (which usually means they carved really well, felt lively underfoot, didn’t have a speed limit, and would likely be very versatile in all conditions), I have to say these skis topped my list of favorites and very well may make their way into my ski arsenal next year:

-K2 Pinnacle 95
-Nordica Enforcer
-Armada E-Dollo (rename of this year’s El Dente)
-Head Instinct Ti
-Volkl 90Eight

Lastly, I was able to use a pair of Leki poles with the Trigger system during the demo, and while I always like how they worked when I tired them in our store display, I’ve never actually skied them. GAME CHANGER. They are without a doubt worth the money, and will really change the way you think about poles.

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Brian’s notes:

(6’3″, 220 lbs, skis like his hair is on fire! Loves to be aggressive.)

Salomon MTN 95 184cm: Ski that has no limit. Extremely light carbon and wood built ski that pushes like a GS ski or slides right around like a fat powder ski. Absolutely fabulous. This ski had no limit and had no end. When I wanted to take fast quick turns it reacted, yet when I wanted to slow it down and slide my turns or even take slow long turns it did it all. Awesome looking snow camoish cosmetic and definitely a ski I recommend for anyone looking for that one ski quiver. Old or young, this ski will make skiing bring an even bigger smile to your face.

Head Monster 88 177cm: light easy cruising ski. This is the new all mountain ski that was spun off the old rev series skis. This ski gives you the stability of being a true groomer ski while acting and playing like a powder ski.

Head Instinct 83 184cm: This ski was the most like a “beer league” race ski. The ski will toss you and is very strong. The ski turned quick and held an edge like you would expect a race ski to do. The beauty of it all, though, is that it’s not a race ski, just an awesome groomer ski. Super cool looking cosmetic to this new ski as well.

Volkl RTM 84 177cm: Sleek new look for the RTM series this year. Volkl cut off lots of weight and added UVO plates to dampen the ski in the 84, 86. Ski (of course) is fast and quick and an absolute power house for that skier looking to take fast, hard turns.

K2 Pinnacle 95 184cm: K2 has a new look and a new shape, and it’s looking good. The cosmetics look awesome with the bright green top sheet you’re for sure going to be looking good out on the slopes. The weight felt balanced and the turn initiation was tight and quick. Great do-it-all versatile ski for anywhere from intermediate to far advanced level skiers.

Nordica NRGY 80 184cm: Ski is light and fast. Still the traditional 80 underfoot and completely rips just like a GS ski. Swing weight is fast and this ski will toss you around if you give it enough energy. Anyone with a race background who is now retired from racing, please jump on one of these!

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Tony’s notes:

(5’8″, 150 lbs, loves short, fat skis and making a ton of turns. His very favorite, though: tree skiing.)

Volkl RTM series-This series from Volkl now has a new shape and lighter design. These skis deliver precise edge control while still allowing you to explore the mountain. Volkl always makes some of the best skis out there.

Salomon MTN Explore 95-This brand new series of ski from Salomon is amazing, definitely a staff favorite. This ski is super lightweight, while still giving you the control needed to conquer the whole mountain. Can be used as a mountain charger or as a touring ski.

Head Monster 88/98/105-Head replaced the Rev series with the Instinct and Monster series of skis. The Monster, being the larger of the series, starts with the 88 waist and goes up to a 105. Ski handles nicely, giving nice easy turns while handling the crud and groomers. Great for intermediate to advance skiers looking for an all mountain ski.

Nordica NRGY Series. The Nordica NRGY series is still one of my favorite newly designed skis from all the companies. These skis can ski anywhere on the mountain, including the race course. Definitely try these out if you have the chance.

Volkl Racetiger and Salomon XMAX- looking for a “beer league” race ski or just some of the tightest turning skis on the hill, look no further. These skis will amaze even the most advanced skiers.

K2 Pinnacle Series- K2 has a new series of skis in the Pinnacle. These skis not only look good but ski great. Both the Pinnacle 95 and 105 skied hard, while being playful enough for the rest of the mountain.

Armada Edollo- the upgrade to the Al Dente, this ski looks good and is super soft in the tip, while still being a playful all mountain ski.

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Bob’s notes:

(5’11”, 155lbs, an ex-racer who skis like one.)

A new ski from Salomon, the MTN 95 was the hands-down favorite.The MTN 95 is extremely lightweight and at 95 underfoot it should provide excellent performance in the soft stuff. We tested this ski on hard-pack conditions where it held an edge as well as anything else that I’ve skied and had virtually no chatter.

My second favorite ski of the day was Volkl’s Racetiger SL. A very different animal from the Salomon, the Racetiger SL is a pure race ski. The Racetiger is quick, agile, and aggressive; you have to stay on top of them but as long as you do they will deliver you quickly and precisely from turn to turn.

Coming in third was the Volkl RTM 8.0. This is one of our entry level package skis and very little has changed from previous years. I was surprised at how well this ski held an edge and how aggressively it could carve. Upon completing a turn, this ski does not have as much pop its higher-performance brethren, but that makes it easier to handle for beginner to intermediate skiers.

On a side note, it was good to see that Salomon had not changed the Q-Lab except for the graphic; because why mess with perfection.

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2016 Snowboard

Josh and Jay’s Notes:

Lets be honest. Every snowboard company out there has some cool technology, but K2 continues to stand out with some unique new arrows for your quiver. While introducing some all new board shapes as they head into their 27th year of snowboarding, K2 is shaping (in more ways than one) the growth of snowboarding. With the 2015/16 season they are continuing to not only advance board technology, but shapes as well. No aspect of the mountain is overlooked as focus was put into a variety of areas from the pow to the park and of course with a variety of styles.

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There are two new faces this season in the CoolBean and the Carveair. Their shape may standout like a sore thumb in the lift lines, but your riding will standout ten-fold the whole way down the mountain. Both of these boards have been designed with powder in mind. Even with that said they have the ability to simply turn hard pack into a wonderland of hard carves, that after performed will have you scratching your head and asking yourself “did I just do that on a snowboard”. These boards are a step back to early days of snowboarding when all of the board shapes were created to maximize the surfy feel and weren’t the cookie cutter true twin that we are used to with today’s board line-ups. While they are a step back into the past they are also a giant leap into the future. These boards are a nod to the future of snowboarding as a sport and showcase just how far board shape can be pushed.

If you’re interested in trying out these new products “before they will be on the market”, come visit us at Granite Peak this upcoming Saturday.  Registration starts at 9:00 am in the main village (a $5 donation is requested with all proceeds going to support Wausau area youth ski programs).  Demos go out from 10:00am to 3:00pm.  Stop by, say hi, and ride something new!