Try Before You Buy: Watersports Demos at Shep’s

We hope you’ve been taking advantage of our ski demos in the winter, because it’s your chance to test out the latest and greatest performance skis before making the purchase. And now? Now you can do it in summer too! Our waterski and wakeboard demos are in & ready.

For just $25 per day, you can ride the new goods. And if you make a purchase yet this summer, half of the money you spent on demos will be put toward your bill. Yes, we mean it!!

What are you waiting for? Grab some demo gear and get in the boat!

HO_Skis_Action_Womens_Freeride

Visit us in the store for details. As usual, you must be 18+ to demo, or have your parent/guardian with you.

Special Bike Offer for 2015 Grads!

maui-graduation-party-imageGraduations are something to celebrate! If you have a highschool, college, or other graduate on your gift list this spring, we have the perfect idea for you. Why not gift these dedicated students wheels to roll ahead onto the road they’ve paved?

Buy the graduate a bike from Shep’s (you’ll already be saving with Shep’s sale price!) and get $25 in FREE bike accessories*, a FREE 30-day Check-up and FREE 1-year Tune-up!  All adult bikes qualify: Road bikes, Mountain Bikes, Comfort and BMX bikes are all included.  And as usual, we’ll install the computer, basket, rack, lights or other gear you select for free.

DB_15_CalicoSpt_silver_profile

 

If you find more than $25 in accessories to complete the ride, you’ll get 20% off the additional items. The good news keeps on comin’.

 

 

Choose from our extensive selection of locks, computers, lights, baskets, pumps, saddles, bags, fenders, helmets and much, much more.  Shep’s is Wausau’s bike shop, and we think graduation is worth celebrating.  You’ve earned it!

Is your graduate headed to a new zip code? We can pack and ship your new bike too.  Just ask.

Bring your graduation announcement or invitation to qualify for this special offer and we’ll help you choose the perfect bike for your graduate.

Offer ends June 30, 2015

*$25 free bike accessories must be selected from in-stock inventory and will be calculated at retail price.  Does not include special-order items.  Sorry, children’s bicycles are not included in this offer.

Save the Hassle & Get a Yakima Rack

Yakima 3

Photo: instagram.com/yakimaracks

We’ve probably all tried to cram a bike into the too-small trunk, always to realize it’s not worth the scratches, grease, and parts moved out of alignment. Maybe the snow covered skis that begin to drip all over the moment you crank the heat is more familiar to you? If you’re feeling us, this is where Yakima comes in.

Yakima makes racks for a variety of needs with a variety of prices. If you need to carry your bike, you can choose to carry it on top of your car or on a hitch mount. Need a cargo box up top? Sure thing, how much space do you need? Want to carry kayaks or skis? Yakima racks can do it all.

Here’s how car-top Yakima systems work:

Yakima2

Photo: instagram.com/yakimaracks

1- Start with the parts you need to create the rack system on the top of your car. Depending on the make/model/year of your car, and what it may or may not come with from the factory, we’ll select the specific clips & bars you need. This part stays on your car and acts as the “base” to build off of.

2- Once you have your base, you can choose which systems you want to add, depending on what you want to carry. Onto your bars, you can attach the kayak carriers, bike carriers, cargo boxes, etc. These parts can be easily taken on and off, so you can customize your rack for the weekend ahead.

Come chat with our staff about your car & carrying needs and we’ll help you out. And, if you act soon, you can take advantage of an offer from Yakima and get a $20 rebate for purchases over $300. Yakima

You taught us well, Mom

We’re a first class outdoor specialty store, not a greeting card shop.  But, we know a good poem when we read one. And we’re all about value, so we like a good sale.  You taught us well, Mom.

How did you find the energy, Mom
To do all the things you did,
To be teacher, nurse and counselor
To me, when I was a kid.Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 2.01.16 PM..

How did you do it all, Mom,
Be a chauffeur, cook and friend,
Yet find time to be a playmate,
I just can’t comprehend.
I see now it was love, Mom
That made you come whenever I’d call,
Your inexhaustible love, Mom
And I thank you for it all.

Life is great in Wausau, Wisconsin for lucky kids whose mom’s teach them how to ski, camp, paddle, do yoga, ice skate, waterski, bike, roller skate, play tennis, sing, read, cook, plant, paint, care for the environment and care for others.  We personally thank Dorothy, Carol, and all of our moms for all they do for us, and all they have taught us.  Happy Mother’s Day!

What gift will you choose for her?  To start, select from our huge inventory of Unknown-9 Unknown Unknown-1 Unknown-4 Unknown-10 Unknown-3 images Unknown-8 Unknown-5 Unknown Unknown-1 Unknown-6dresses, yoga gear, sportswear, sandals, trail shoes, handbags and more of what you love from these well loved brands.  Of course we have awesome bikes, day packs, water skis, tennis and winter sports gear she loves too.  Love ya mom!

 

Unknown-2 images-1 Unknown-7Unknown-5

Successful cyclists adopt these smart habits

We like these summaries from our friends at Diamondback bikes and bicyclesafe.com. Keep yourself safe out there and reap the benefits of a two-wheeled commute.

 

Avoid busy streets.

One of the biggest mistakes that people make when they start biking is to take the exact same routes they used when they were driving.  It’s usually better to take different streets with fewer and slower cars.  Sure, cyclists have a right to the road, but that’s a small consolation when you’re dead.  Consider how far you can take this strategy:  If you learn your routes well, you’ll find that in many cities you can travel through neighborhoods to get to most places, only crossing the busiest streets rather than traveling on them.

Light up.

Too obvious?  Well, if it’s so obvious, then why do most night-time cyclists ride without lights?  Bike shops have rear red blinkies for $15 or less.  Headlights are just as important as rear lights.  And modern headlights use LED’s so the batteries last ten times longer than old-school headlights.


One cyclist tied this bright noodle to the back of his bike, exactly the width of his handlebars, to show drivers how much space he takes up on the road.

Take the whole lane when appropriate.

It’s often safer to take the whole lane, or at least ride a little bit to the left, rather than hug the right curb. Here’s why:

  • Cars at intersections ahead of you can see you better if you’re squarely in the road rather than on the extreme edge where you’re easily overlooked.
  • Taking the lane prevents cars from passing you too closely on narrow roadways.
  • Riding a bit to the left prevents you from being a victim of a door accident.

You might worry about slowing down the traffic behind you if you take the lane.  But if you’re on the kind of street where you’ve got cars blocked up behind you or constantly changing lanes to get around you, you’re probably on the wrong street and should find a quieter neighborhood street.

Taking the lane works especially well in most roundabouts.   The traffic generally moves slower so it’s easy to keep up, riding in the lane makes you more visible to motorists, and taking the lane prevents motorists from right-hooking you as they exit the circle.

It’s perfectly legal for you to take the lane when appropriate.  Most state laws say you have to ride as far to the right as is “practicable”.  Here are some things that make it impracticable to ride to the extreme right:

  1. You’re in a heavy traffic area with lots of side streets, parking lots, or driveways ahead and to your right.  Cars turning left won’t see you because they’re looking for traffic in themiddle of the road, not on the extreme edge of the road.  Move left.
  2. Cars are passing you too closely.  If the lane is too narrow for cars to pass you safely, then move left and take the whole lane.  Getting buzzed by cars is dangerous.
  3. Cars are parked on the right-hand side of the road.  If you ride too close to these you’re gonna get doored when someone gets out of their car.  Move left.

There are risks to both riding to the extreme right as well as taking the lane.  Whether you ride to the right or take the lane depends on the conditions of the roadway you’re on.  On wide roadways with few intersections/driveways, right further right.  On narrow roads with lots of intersections, ride farther to the left.   It’s not always better to take the lane or to hug the curb; it depends on the roadway you’re on.

Signal your turns.

You’re less likely to get hit when your movement doesn’t take motorists by surprise. Let them know you’re about to turn or move left or right by signalling with your arm. Point your left arm out to move left, and point your right arm out to move right. (You might have learned an old way of signaling a right turn with your left arm, but drivers have no idea what that means, so it’s useless. Signal a right turn with your right arm.) Before signaling left, be sure to check your mirror or look behind you before signaling (since a car passing too closely can take your arm out).

Re-think music players and mobile phones.

It’s more important to hear what’s around you when you’re biking than when you’re driving. Whether you want to ride with headphones is your choice, but doing so does increase your risk. Similarly, texting or talking with a mobile phone raises the risk level. When you’re mixing with car traffic, the fewer distractions the better. Also, you’ll want both hands free in case you have to brake suddenly.

Ride as if you were invisible.

It’s often helpful to ride in such a way that motorists won’t hit you even if they don’t see you. You’re not trying to be invisible, you’re trying to make it irrelevant whether cars see you or not. If you ride in such a way that a car has to see you to take action to avoid hitting you (e.g., by their slowing down or changing lanes), then that means they will definitely hit you if they don’t see you. But if you stay out of their way, then you won’t get hit even if they didn’t notice you were there.

On very fast roads cars have less time to see you because they’re approaching so fast. Of course, you should avoid fast roads in the first place if at all possible, unless there’s plenty of room for a car and a bike side by side. And if there IS such room, then on fast roadways, you can practice invisibility by riding to the extreme right. If you’re far enough right that you’re not in the part of the lane the cars are in, then they’ll zoom by and won’t hit you, even if they never saw you.

Here’s another example: It’s a good idea to signal a left turn, but it’s a better idea to make your left turn at a time or place where there aren’t cars behind you that could hit you while you’re stopped and waiting to make that turn. You can hang out in the middle of the street, stopped, with your left arm out, waiting to make your turn, but you’re counting on cars behind you to see you and stop. If they don’t see you, you’re in trouble.

Naturally we don’t advocate running red lights, but if you’re the kind of person who does, then apply the invisibility principle when deciding on whether to run a particular light: Could any cross traffic possibly hit me if I were invisible? If yes, then absolutely don’t do it. Never make a car have to slow down to avoid hitting you (red light or not). Remember, the more you rely on cars to see you to avoid hitting you, the more chances they’ll have to actually do so.

Remember, you’re not trying to BE invisible, you’re just riding with the assumption that cars can’t see you. Of course, you certainly want them to see you, and you should help them with that. That’s why you’ll wave to motorists whom you think might be about to pull out in front of you, and why you’ll be lit up like a Christmas tree at night (front and rear lights).

Remember that in many cases you’ll need to take the lane, in which case you’re counting on motorists to see you.

Pedaling along country roads warrants a specific set of safety considerations. As you roam rural lanes, keep the following in mind.

Don’t expect motorists to see you. In city traffic, dense streets and attentive drivers mean the key to safety is being assertive and using the rhythm of traffic to your advantage. But as your bicycle carries you away from town, the safer place to be becomes the side of the road. Likewise, plan to dodge cars in intersections even when you have the right-of-way.

Look behind you. Glance over your shoulder as you approach every driveway, intersection, and road hazard. Yes, every single one. A common car-on-bike incident is the right hook. This is when a car passes a cyclist, slows to turn right, and obliviously crosses the cyclist’s path on the edge of the street.

Watch for oncoming traffic. Passing motorists often accelerate into the opposite lane without looking for cyclists in their path. Similarly, I shudder to think about how frequently I make fast right turns onto two-lane roads without considering what might be might be fast approaching on the wrong side.

Avoid riding into the sunset. Riding into the sun makes you virtually invisible to motorists. If you’re stuck heading west at the end of the day, try taking a meandering route. And when the sun’s at your back, keep in mind that road users ahead will have difficult time seeing you.

Pause in high-visibility places. Whether you’re changing clothes, fixing a flat, or answering the call of nature, wait until you’re a safe distance from blind corners or hillcrests.

Don’t antagonize motorists. Sure, they might pass to closely, or worse. But on isolated roads, it’s best stay calm and let the incident roll off your back. It’s the only way to stay safe, have fun, and protect our image as cyclists.